Baptism

Baptism is the beginning of our life of faith; the beginning of getting to know and understand what being loved by God means.  Baptism is God’s token to us of God’s great love.  Like all the sacraments, Baptism carries us forward to a place where we want to give a sign to those around us that we are on the journey and will continue to learn about our God, and Christ Jesus.

At St. Mark’s Baptism is celebrated at major times of the year; around Easter, Christmas, Pentecost, Transfiguration, All Saints’, Holy Cross and the Reign of Christ Sunday.  St. Mark’s is a very active parish and the calendar of events is influenced by our children, our youth and the festivals of the year.  Once you are active at the parish, you will begin to see the rhythm.  Please email us about the dates for upcoming celebrations.

Baptism is the time we join God’s family and become a young Christian.  It is the beginning of a life-long journey of faith.  It is not an isolated event but the start of a partnership between the person, family, sponsors and parish that seek a full stature of Christ for all individuals.

When the privilege of Baptism is extended to infants and young children the assumption is that those who direct their lives will be Christians and practice faith.  For that reason, Baptism is not done in isolation but in the midst of the community, a community in which the family has decided to be their parish home for the present time.

Baptism is the sign instituted by Jesus to unite us with his Baptism, life, death and resurrection.

In our custom all who are baptized in any tradition in the name of the Holy Trinity with water are welcome to be a part of our community.  It is our hope that they will feel free to come to the Lord’s table for communion, but also further explore their faith among us.

Adult Baptism

Adult Baptism is the church’s norm.  The extension of baptism (membership) to infants and young children is on the basis of the commitment of the parents and sponsors to be icons of Christ in the lives of the children.  The church is experiencing more adult baptisms since many have grown up in non-Christian homes, or with parents who desired to leave the decision to their children when they were of age.